Important Facts about Ovarian Cancer: Risk Factors and Symptoms

picture of ovarian cancer stages

The ovarian cancer is a malignant tumor born in any part of the ovary. See real pictures of the disease at http://www.drjenniferashton.com/ovarian-cancer-pictures/. The ovary is a very complex organ that can seat numerous tumors of very different morphological range, some of which are equipped with hormone function, which explains the wide variety of classifications. The most common location is in the epithelium covering the ovary. It also develops from the germ cells or connective tissue around the ovary. The risk of developing ovarian cancer is directly correlated with abnormalities in the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2.

Risk factors

The drugs used for ovarian stimulation in the treatment of sterility for more than one year, as the Clomiphene, increase the incidence of ovarian cancer. Meanwhile, the labor, the use of oral contraceptives, the tubal ligation and hysterectomy reduce the incidence of ovarian cancer (by a yet unknown mechanism). Some are still missing evidence in association with ovarian cancer, factors including exposure to talc and asbestos, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), a diet rich in fat and toxic factors such as tobacco, alcohol , coffee and ionizing radiation. If a woman’s mother and / or sister suffered from ovarian, breast or uterine cancer, she has a higher risk of developing the disease. Also, women who have suffered cysts or endometriosis.

Source: http://www.drjenniferashton.com/ovarian-cancer-causes-risk-factors/

Symptoms or signs of ovarian cancer

Usually, ovarian cancer does not produce symptoms at the beginning. That is why, most cases are detected when the disease is advanced, but if detected at an early stage can improve the prognosis. Here are the signs women should pay attention to and quickly seek medical attention if they are recurrent or last long.

– Abdominal distension
– Having difficulty to eat or feeling full fast
– Pain in abdomen and pelvis region

There are also other misleading symptoms common in women with cancer that also occur with ovarian cancer.

– Abnormal menstrual cycles
– Digestive symptoms such as constipation, increased gas, indigestion, appetite loss, nausea and vomiting;
– Sense of pelvic heaviness
– Strained abdomen or belly
– Lower abdominal discomfort
– Unexplained back pain that worsens over time
– Loss or gain of weight.

Other symptoms that can occur with this disease:
– Hirsutism: abnormal and excessive hair growth on body parts where hair should not occur or should be minimal;
– Increased urinary frequency or urgency.

Source: http://www.drjenniferashton.com/ovarian-cancer-symptoms/

What Are Common Signs of Bladder Cancer

Bladder cancer is a serious condition in which there is an abnormal growth of tissue in the bladder. This growth can spread to surrounding muscles and other tissues. If it is caught early, it can be treated.

The most common sign of bladder cancer is blood being noticeable in your urine according to cancercaregiving.com. If you ever notice blood in your urine, or experience long-term pain, or severe pain when passing urine, you should definitely see a doctor so that the can investigate the cause.

Bladder cancer that is contained within the bladder is usually relatively easy to treat, and people tend to make a full recovery. However, if the cancer becomes ‘muscle invasive’ it has more chance of spreading to other organs, and this is where it tends to become harder to eradicate, and can become fatal.

This cancer is often caused by exposure to toxic chemicals. Cigarette smoke is one common cause, and others include the chemicals that used to be used in common manufacturing processes. The good news is that the chemicals which are now known to be carcinogenic have been banned, so there is less risk of younger people developing bladder cancer through occupational exposure to hazardous substances. The time between exposure to developing the cancer, however, can be decades, so older people may still be at risk.

Sometimes, it is necessary to remove the whole bladder to treat the cancer, and if this is done then doctors will either make a new bladder out of part of your bowel, or they will make an opening to fit a bag that will act as a bladder. This form of treatment is only used if it is not possible to remove only the cancerous part, leaving the rest of the bladder completely intact and fully functional.